Category: Volunteer

#PPHFHWhyIVolunteer

Debbie McMonigle, a volunteer with Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity (PPHFH), shares why she volunteers. Debbie has been volunteering with PPHFH for nine years and believes in helping families and giving back to the community. Support Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity and the affordable housing cause in Colorado Springs, Colorado by sharing your stories on the Campaign for Pikes Peak Community Facebook page using the hashtag #PPHFHwhyIvolunteer. To learn more about Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity visit their website PikesPeakHabitat.org or call Isaac Ring, the Volunteer Coordinator, at 719.475.7800 ext. 102.  

Bike and Build 2016 Supports Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity

Students from all over the nation rode their bicycles across the country to help support the affordable housing cause. ‪#‎BikeandBuild2016‬, a nonprofit organization, had two teams of cyclists that stopped in the Pikes Peak region to help build a ‪#‎PikesPeakHabitat‬ house for the Wickwar Family. Show your support by watching the video below. Learn more about how you can get involved with Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity by following the link below: https://www.facebook.com/CampaignforPikesPeakCommunity/  

Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity Wraps-Up National Women Build Week

Volunteers from the Junior League of Colorado Springs dig a drainage ditch around a Habitat home foundation during Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity National Women Build Week May 7, 2016, Fountain, Colorado.
Volunteers from the Junior League of Colorado Springs dig a drainage ditch with shovels and pickaxes with Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity May 7, 2016, wrapping up National Women Build Week. National Women build Week is an annual weeklong event that invites women to dedicate at least one day to build strength and independence through home building. “With no experience in construction at all, I felt completely comfortable. They walk you through everything step by step,” said Stephanie Curnow, Junior League of Colorado Springs member and National Women Build Week volunteer. “Overall it was really great.” Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity had 126 individuals who signed up to volunteer for National Women Build Week. Eighty of the volunteers were women. Volunteer shifts are a total of three and a half hours and include a morning shift from 8:30am to 12:00pm or an afternoon shift from 1:00pm to 4:30pm. “We had a lot of things going on this week including trim-work, painting, windows, foundation-work and front yard work,” said Joe Allman, Construction Supervisor. “We were also able to complete both siding and insulation projects.”
Volunteers from the Junior League of Colorado Springs lift a wheel barrow of dirt during Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity National Women Build Week on May 7, 2016, Fountain, Colorado.
Volunteers from the Junior League of Colorado Springs lift a wheel barrow of dirt during Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity National Women Build Week on May 7, 2016, Fountain, Colorado.
This week volunteers worked on several Habitat homes, to include the Gallegos family home. The Gallegos home is expected to be complete this August. The Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity National Women Build Week program began in 2008 and has completed three homes in the region. “Volunteering with habitat is an extremely fulfilling experience,” said Nailah Ellis Timberlake, Junior League of Colorado Springs member and National Women Build Week volunteer. “The work that Habitat does is important and if you have the time I think you should come out and support.”

Retired Green Beret Continues to Create a Strong Legacy in the Special Operations Community

Col. (Retired) Holloway is the Honorary Colonel of the Special Forces Regiment
Col. (Retired) Holloway is the Honorary Colonel of the Special Forces Regiment
Picture an elite American hero who makes tough decisions and completes the mission to keep us safe. This is what many Americans understand about what a Special Forces Soldier does. It is true that the men of the Special Forces are quiet professionals comprised of generations of elite Soldiers, but it is also a brotherhood of men who care deeply about the legacy and mentorship of its men. James L. “Hawk” Holloway, Jr. Col. (Retired) is one of those legacies. He spent 21 of his 30 years as an officer in the U.S. Army’s Special Operations Command. He is a seasoned Green Beret, or as the younger Soldiers in the regiment call him, a “gray beard.” He is a wealth of knowledge and experience. He also has a huge heart for the Special Forces community. Spending much of his time mentoring the younger Green Berets and making sure that they and their families are taken care of. “It might sound corny, but it’s love for my regiment,” he said. “I had the privilege and honor to serve with the best Soldiers in the Army.” Holloway retired from the U.S. Army Special Operations Command nearly nine years ago, he continues to stay active in the community. He served on the Board of Directors for the Green Beret Foundation for about four years. He currently serves on the Board of Advisors for the foundation. He has helped make important decisions that affect the personal care and lives of many Soldiers and their families. Holloway is also a role player at the Joint Readiness Training Center in Fort Polk, La. He mentors the younger generation of Green Berets using his experience and knowledge to help create scenario-based training. “He mentors everybody,” said John Bauer a former Soldier who worked as Holloway’s Plans Officer in the U.S. Army Special Operations Command and a Joint Readiness Training Center role player. “He is very willing and eager to share his experiences with the younger guys to help them shape their way forward.”
Holloway with Special Forces Col. (Retired) George Latham. The two often discuss the way Special Forces Regiment's way forward.
Holloway with Special Forces Col. (Retired) George Latham. The two often discuss the way forward for the Special Forces Regiment.
He credits his leadership and management to numerous mentors. One in particular was Col. (Retired) Edward M. McDonald. “He was my Battalion Commander in 1st of the 5th Infantry and known to many as Col. Mac,” said Holloway. “One thing he said was, ‘people count.’ I keep those kinds of things in mind.” The strong legacy of the command can be attributed to his continued support and dedication through the Green Beret Foundation and mentorship to the younger Soldiers. “He is absolutely completely committed to making sure the boys are taken care of,” said John Bauer a former Soldier who worked as Holloway’s Plans Officer in the U.S. Army Special Operations Command and a Joint Readiness Training Center role player. To learn more about the Green Beret Foundation go to http://www.greenberetfoundation.org/

How to Volunteer with a Busy Schedule

Photo: Houston Chronicle (c) Tassii
Photo: Houston Chronicle
(c) Tassii
Volunteering is good for both the mind and body. Studies have found health benefits from volunteering as little as 100 hours annually. People who volunteer gain valuable social skills and live longer more fulfilled lives. Busy schedules can make volunteering seem like an overwhelming addition to life. If volunteering is something you are passionate about, but you haven’t been able to find the time, this article provides steps to help you incorporate volunteering into your life. 1. Don’t Overwhelm Yourself Don’t force yourself to give your time to something you aren’t passionate about. This makes a task seem like even more of a burden. Volunteer for something that you are already passionate about. Love the outdoors? Volunteer for outdoor beautification projects. Enjoy teaching young people? Volunteer to become an adult mentor for youth in your community. 2. Talk to Your Boss About Implementing a Volunteer Program Weekends filled with attending your kids sporting events and recovering from the workweek? Ask your boss or the company you work for to implement a volunteer program. Sell the idea as a way to create cohesion in the office and create a brand of “social responsibility” for the company. There are numerous companies that have volunteer programs to emulate and pull ideas from to pitch to your boss and get a volunteer program in motion. 3. Involve Your Family              Volunteer for an activity that the whole family will enjoy. This allows you to spend quality time with your spouse and children as well as teach the importance of community. 4. Donate Sometimes finding time to volunteer just isn’t possible. There is nothing wrong with donating. Donating covers a vast range of giving. Whether it is monetary, clothing or food. You can also make items to donate. Are you passionate about knitting? Make a blanket and donate it to a shelter. This takes time, but you can do it from the comfort of your own home on your own schedule. Volunteering should be fun and fulfilling. Everyone’s time is important. Think about what you are passionate about and incorporate that into your life. Don’t feel guilty if you are unable to attend every volunteer event. Remember every act creates a ripple. Tips Not sure where to begin? Go to https://www.volunteermatch.org. You can search for what you are passionate about in your local area with dates and times that fit your schedule. Create a journal or blog that covers your volunteer hours. Write about how it made you feel, the people you met and reflect on your experiences. This will allow you to pinpoint exactly what you are passionate about. Certain expenses and donations involved during volunteer work are also tax deductible.