Tagged: Rehabilitation

Rescue and Rehabilitation a Priority for The Wild Animal Sanctuary

Photo taken from June’s blog Growing Up in Fort Collins
Photo taken from June’s blog Growing Up in Fort Collins
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Amber Martin Graduate Student, Full Sail University ALMartin2@fullsail.edu The Wild Animal Sanctuary is a non-profit organization located in Keenesburg, Colorado that rescues and rehabilitates large carnivores. Most of the animals come from very poor conditions and are seized by local agencies. The sanctuary strongly believes in allowing these animals the care and space to live full healthy lives without being exploited. “We’ll have lions that show up, that don’t even know how to roar because they have never been around another lion to hear it or have a reason to roar. We want to get them around others of their own kind, so that they can learn what kind of animal they are. What it’s like to be a tiger or a lion,” said Kent Drotar, Director of the Sanctuary Ambassador Program. “We want these animals to live as long as possible and healthy as the animals they were meant to be.” The sanctuary covers 720 acres of land and most of the habitats are between five and 25 acres. The location is important for the sanctuary to thrive. It is close enough to the Denver metro area that they are able to get the volunteers, equipment, and material needed in order to maintain the place. It is also far enough away that they have the ability to expand. The sanctuary currently has just over 400 animals and about 45 different habitats. They feed around 35,000 pounds of food a week. With only five or six people on the animal care staff, volunteers are an extremely important necessity to help maintain the place. Volunteers help sort food, prepare meals, clean enclosures, and clean and fill water tanks. “Most of them do it because they love animals. They want to make a difference in animal’s lives,” said Kent Drotar, Director of the Sanctuary Ambassador Program. “We want the volunteers to respect the animals the way we do, which is not as a pet, and not as a way to make money, but simply respect them because of what they are.” To learn more about The Wild Animal Sanctuary please visit http://www.wildanimalsanctuary.org or check out their latest newsletter which features Chase, one of the tigers living at the sanctuary. About the Wild Animal Sanctuary The Founder, Pat Craig, was the youngest person at 19 years old to become licensed to have a wild animal sanctuary in January 1980. The sanctuary began on Pat’s parent's 15-acre farm in Boulder, Colorado. However, that space filled up very quickly and he moved the sanctuary to Lyons, Colorado. In 1994 the sanctuary was moved one last time to Keenesburg, Colorado where it has been for the last 22 years. Pat Craig is currently the Executive Director of the organization.